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Does Homework Help or Hurt?

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❶Remarkably, the scores then declined for those who did 45 minutes, then declined again for those who did an hour or more!

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Does homework improve student achievement?
From the homework laboratories

Research suggests that, with two exceptions, homework for elementary children is not beneficial and does not boost achievement levels. The first exception is in the case of a student who is struggling to complete classroom tasks. The second is when students are preparing for a test. For example, students might review a list of words for 10 minutes in preparation for a spelling test the next day. Parental help with homework appears to be beneficial only if the child has already learned the concepts and simply needs more time to complete the assignments.

In fact, some evidence suggests that K—4 students who spend too much time on homework actually achieve less well. For students in Grades 6 and 7, up to an hour of meaningful homework per night can be beneficial. Things change in high school.

Most studies involving high school students suggest that students who do homework achieve at a higher rate. Based on his research, Cooper suggests this rule of thumb: In other words, Grade 1 students should do a maximum of 10 minutes of homework per night, Grade 2 students, 20 minutes, and so on. Expecting academic students in Grade 12 to occasionally do two hours of homework in the evening—especially when they are studying for exams, completing a major mid-term project or wrapping up end-of-term assignments—is not unreasonable.

But insisting that they do two hours of homework every night is expecting a bit much. Research suggests that homework benefits high school students most in the following situations:. While the debate continues, one thing remains clear: For that reason, assigning students some homework can be beneficial. However, how much homework a child should do and how often are questions that can be answered only after taking into account the unique needs of the child and his or her learning style, goals and challenges.

Leslie Crawford June 14, You know the drill. The pages of polynomials have been abandoned. The paper on the Battle of Waterloo seems to have frozen in time with Napoleon lingering eternally over his breakfast at Le Caillou. Then come the tears and tantrums — while we parents wonder, Does the gain merit all this pain? However the drama unfolds night after night, year after year, most parents hold on to the hope that homework after soccer games, dinner, flute practice, and, oh yes, that childhood pastime of yore known as playing advances their children academically.

But what does homework really do for kids? Or is it just busywork? Whether or not homework helps, or even hurts, depends on who you ask. It makes kids stressed-out and tired and makes them hate school more. Books like The End of Homework , The Homework Myth , and The Case Against Homework and the film Race to Nowhere make the case that homework, by taking away precious family time and putting kids under unneeded pressure, is an ineffective way to help children become better learners and thinkers.

One Canadian couple recently took their homework apostasy all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada. After arguing that there was no evidence that it improved academic performance, they won a ruling that exempted their two children from all homework.

In an effort to answer this question, researchers have been doing their homework on homework, conducting hundreds of studies over the past several decades.

Despite scores of studies, definitive conclusions remain a matter of some debate. For better or worse, homework is on the rise in the United States. The homework ante has been upped as school administrators respond to increasing pressure for their students to perform better on state-mandated tests. So how can you know if your child is doing the right amount? But where did it come from?

If you think your child is doing too much homework, Cooper recommends talking with her teacher. Recent studies suggest that proper sleep may be far more essential to brain and body development.

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Sep 23,  · For high school students, the positive line continues to climb until between 90 minutes and 2½ hours of homework a night, after which returns diminish. Beyond achievement, proponents of homework argue that it can have many other beneficial effects. They claim it can help students develop good study habits so they are ready to grow as their cognitive capacities mature.

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The average high school student doing homework outperformed 69% of the students in a class with no homework. Homework in middle school was half as effective. In elementary school, there is no measurable correlation between homework and achievement. Despite all the research, homework remains something of a mystery.

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Oct 26,  · Nothing quite inspires fear in the mind of a student as much as the phrase, “Wait, we had homework?” Homework—while often dreaded by students and teachers alike—is an idea which has undoubtedly been powerfully integrated into the education system. One question is being asked over and over again—does homework really help students perform better in. For younger students, the relationship between homework and performance was much weaker. The study showed that not only does homework help grades, but it can also help study habits, attitudes toward school, self-discipline, inquisitiveness, and independent problem-solving skills.

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Does Homework Help or Hurt? Posted by Jason Przypek, Editor on Monday, November 17, then they are going to hold students’ feet to the fire by heaping on the homework in the hopes that students and parents will pick up whatever slack is left from incomplete mastery in the classroom. Missing or late homework assignments are punished with. Writing for students primary homework help tudors homework help tudor clothes does homework help or hurt tudors primary homework help. Students may have to get a job to help support their family, affecting the hours they sleep and work on their homework.